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FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THE VISUAL ARTS PROGRAM
QCC’s Visual Arts Program places art and sexuality, long silent bed partners, into productive dialogue. Through an extensive series of exhibitions and projects, the Visual Arts Program is dedicated to exploring the various forms and directions which queer visual culture might take, showcasing the work of nationally and internationally established artists, while examining the queerness of contemporary art and culture.

Wheelchair Accessible

Childcare Available: Wednesday to Saturday, call KidSpace at The Center (415) 865-5632

Getting there: The SF LGBT Community Center, 1800 Market Street @ Octavia, 3rd floor. Please use public transportation to access The Center. Limited street parking available. The MUNI Metro lines J,K,L,M,N, the F Street Car, or MUNI Bus lines 6,7,9, 10, 14, 21, 26, 47, 49, 66 and 71 all run within 5 blocks of the Center, many run within 1 block. Also, take BART to SF Civic
Center, then transfer to Muni Metro or F lines.


Further information about Gallery Programs contact qccgallery@yahoo.com


June 2002: Robert Rauschenberg

(SAN FRANCISCO):The Queer Cultural Center (QCC) is proud to present Robert Rauschenberg from the Collection of Terry Van Brunt, the first in a new series of visual arts exhibitions and projects sponsored by Qcc's Visual Arts Program. The exhibition brings together some 50 works by Robert Rauschenberg'paintings, sculptures, and ephemera, most of which have never been exhibited -- from a collection assembled by Terry Van Brunt, the chief studio assistant and companion of the artist during much of the 1970s and '80s. This collection was born of the emotional exchange and day-to-day interactions between the two men.

Sometimes intimate, sometimes opaque, these works cast Rauschenberg's practice into a new light. Here Rauschenberg the man and Rauschenberg the artist merge to unveil much about the artist's more public work. The exhibition powerfully conveys a clear thematic coherence behind what is usually understood as Rauschenberg's random juxtaposition of collage elements.

Robert Rauschenberg, widely celebrated as one of the greatest living artists, is represented in major museum collections around the world. In 1997, the Guggenheim Museum organized the most comprehensive retrospective exhibition of his work. In the late 1950s, Rauschenberg introduced the silkscreened photograph, the found object, and evocative collage back into an art world dominated by the pyrotechnics of flung paint -- such as the abstract drips and splatters of Jackson Pollock. Using eminently recognizable imagery in non-representational ways, Rauschenberg almost single-handedly carried the stuff of the world back into American art.

Robert Rauschenberg from the Collection of Terry Van Brunt is curated by Jonathan D. Katz, Ph.D,
former chair of the Department of GLBT Studies at City College of San Francisco, founder of Harvey Milk Institute, and the first tenured faculty in gay and lesbian studies in the U.S. A leading Rauschenberg scholar, Katz has written a book on the artist, which will be published by University of Chicago Press in 2003. Katz is currently the Executive Coordinator of the Larry Kramer Initiative for Queer Studies and Associate Research Professor in Art History and Women's and Gender Studies at Yale University.

"There is something both melancholic and touching in the way Rauschenberg scours the detritus of the world for those objects and images capable of carrying his deepest thoughts and emotions. In making the stuff of the world speak in his voice, he tacitly acknowledges his inability to speak himself directly," says Jonathan Katz, the exhibition curator.

Qcc's Visual Arts Program places art and sexuality, long silent bed partners, into productive dialogue. Through an extensive series of exhibitions and projects, the Visual Arts Program is dedicated to exploring the various forms and directions which queer visual culture might take, showcasing the work of nationally and internationally established artists, while examining the queerness of contemporary art and culture.

Qcc and The Center Gallery Program

Located in The Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence Gallery at The Center our program is one of the first museum-quality spaces in the US dedicated exclusively to the presentation of queer art –historical and contemporary.

The Queer Cultural Center and the Community Center will be offering a two-fold program in the gallery exploring queer creativity and visual culture.

The Queer Cultural Center will present the work of nationally and internationally established artists whose practices have influenced contemporary art history and cultural debates. This part of the program will provide a coherent series of three exhibitions a year where queer meanings in art are being examined –exposing the various forms and directions which queer visual culture might take.

In addition, the Queer Cultural Center and the Community Center will encourage collaboration with members of the community to present a series of community-based shows. These exhibitions will present works in a wide range of media created or interpreted by members of the Bay Area’s LGBT communities. This will introduce new possibilities of reflection on various aspects of our communities’ history, culture and creativity.

With this dynamic, two-fold approach, the Gallery will actively participate in queer cultural debates shaping today’s queer visual cultures, and will promote an active cultural dialogue within and beyond the region’s LGBT communities.

Qcc and The Center Events

The LGBT Center is collaborating with the Queer Cultural Center (QCC), the area’s premier LGBT arts organization, to coordinate visual and performing arts programs. A large gallery room on the 3rd floor accommodates 41people and many smaller areas throughout The Center are reserved for art exhibits and performances, such as portions of QCC’s National Queer Arts Festival. In addition, The Center provides a 2,300 square foot multipurpose room that can be used as an auditorium. The multipurpose room has a large retractable video screen for films, a stage, a sound and lighting system, and a green room. QCC serves approximately 50,000 people each year and shares its 3rd-floor office space with the Harvey Milk Institute. Before The Center’s establishment, QCC did not have an arts space from which to operate. Founded in 1993, QCC has been extremely successful in building relationships with San Francisco’s arts organizations, artists and technicians.

The Center
The SF LGBT Community Center [ http://www.sfgaycenter.org ]
The San Francisco Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center is home to a dynamic range of organizations and activities that support the needs of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) individuals of every race, gender, age, sexuality, and socio-economic status. The Center supports activities that foster a positive sense of identity, purpose, social support and well being among people and organizations. The Center promotes activities that further define and advance the political, social and cultural agenda of the LGBT community.

Both The Center and the gallery were designed by Jane Cee and partners, Architects.

Getting there: The Community Center is situated at 1800 Market Street (at Octavia). Take MUNI J, K, L, M, N to Van Ness or MUNI F and bus lines 6, 7, 61, 71 to Market and Guerrero.

Exhibitions are free for everyone. The Gallery is on the third floor and there is wheelchair access.

Further information about Gallery Programs contact qccgallery@yahoo.com

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