Owen Keehnen discovered the joy of doing interviews in 1990 when he was asked by a Chicago club magazine to interview Brady Bunch star Eve Plumb. Humiliating himself before Jan Brady prompted him to redeem himself.  He turned his obsessive attention to the burgeoning gay and lesbian cultural scene. Seeing a niche in the national syndication market he began to "con" chats with some of his queer idols (such as David Wojnarowicz, Paul Monette, John Preston, Harry Hay,etc). Before long he had interviewed dozens of queer celebrites and authors and actually became the nationally syndicated interviewer he claimed to be.  He is a former columinst for 'Penthouse Forum' (ironic, ain't it?), 'thing', and 'Men's Style' magazines and had over a dozen short stories published in 'Christopher Street'.  

His fiction, smut, and assorted "pieces" have appeared in dozens of periodicals and anthologies. The first of his interview books with XXX gay porn stars, STARZ, is coming soon.  He is currently involved in two emerging websites --- one erotic www.savagelust.com and one about the indie horror movie scene www.racksandrazors.com. The Chicagoan now works as a massage therapist and is completing work on a horror novel. Neo-conservate trends have made him see the heightened importance of getting his gay and lesbian interviews online. Silence nevermore.

(Sweet) Pam Tent (2004)
I was a teenage Cockette: Talking with foundingmember (Sweet) Pam Tent. . .The Cockettes were a collective of grit and glitter counter-culture performance art radicals who rose from the San Francisco streets to take flamboyant gender-bending politics to a new level. This group of men and women performed their chaotic midnight stage shows at The Palace Theatre in the North Beach neighborhood of San Francisco and virtually overnight became the toast of the town.

Charles Busch (2003)
12 quick questions with film star ('Die Mommie Die', 'Psycho Beach Party'), playwright ('Taboo', 'The Tale of the Allergist's Wife'), stage legend ('Vampire Lesbians of Sodom', 'The Lady in Question', etc.) and novelist (Whores of Lost Atlantis) Charles Busch. . .

Dana Plato (2003)
From 1978-84 Dana Plato played Kimberly Drummond, Conrad Bain's teenage daughter and step-sibling to Gary Coleman and Todd Bridges on the hit NBC sitcom 'Diff’rent Strokes'. Now after a rough 15 years Dana is back, playing a seductive lesbian in the erotic soft-core video feature entitled, you guessed it, 'Different Strokes'…a story of Jack and Jill…and Jill. . .

Steven Saylor (2003)
Most folks familiar with mystery novels will also be familiar with Steven Saylor and his novels set in ancient Rome. . . Roman Blood, Catalina's Riddle, The Venus Throw, A Mist of Prophecies, and The Arms of Nemesis. .

Gavin Geoffrey Dillard (1997)
Recently I had the chance to chat with Gavin, still youthful and yummy at 43, about the lawsuit, life among the rich and famous, his spiritual quest, and the joys of being The Naked Poet. . .

Gloria Gaynor (1997)
Her name is synonymous with disco. She had several Top 40 albums; her songs included such hits as "Honey Bee," "Never Can Say Goodbye," "I Am What I Am," and the biggest record of the disco era, "I Will Survive," which also won her a Grammy for best disco song. . .

Scott O'Hara (1997)
When I talked to Scott for this formal interview he had just written a wild and very smart memoir called Autopornography (1997). . .He first came to prominence in the early 1980s when he was awarded the title 'The Man With The Biggest Dick in San Francisco'. . .

Mark Doty (1996)
Affecionados of contemporary poetry have probably read or heard of gay poet Mary Doty. He has author four collections (TURTLE SWAN, BETHLEHEM IN BROAD DAYLIGHT, MY ALEXANDRIA, and ATLANTIS) . . .

Andrew Holleran (1996)
In 1978 Andrew Holleran exploded onto the gay literary scene with the instant classic Dancer from the Dance. Five years later came his follow-up Nights in Aruba, and five years later he published Ground Zero, a highly praised collection of essays. . .

Joan Jett Blakk (1996)
Joan Jett Blakk is the first drag queen ever to toss her wig into the presidential race. As a candidate for the Queer Nation Party Ms. Blakk plans a complete overhaul of the United States. Anything more than that she will be more than happy to tell you herself. . .

Felice Picano (1996)
When the Lambda Literary Award nominations were recently announced Felice Picano was cited in two different categories: Like People in History (Best Gay Men’s Fiction) and Dryland's End (Best Gay Men’s Fantasy/Science Fiction). . .

Jerry Herman (1996)
The name Jerry Herman is practically synonymous with The Golden Age of Broadway. He is the lyricist and composer behind such blockbuster musicals as 'Mame', 'Hello Dolly', 'La Cage aux Folle', 'Mack and Mabe', and 'Milk and Honey'. . .

Sapphire (1996)
PUSH. This stunning debut by bisexual poet Sapphire is harvesting a bounty of glowing reviews form both the mainstream and gay presses and seems destined to become a classic of socially conscious fiction. . .

Alan Hollinghurst (1995)
In 1988 Alan Hollinghurst exploded onto the literary scene with publication of his stunning debut novel The Swimming Pool LIbrary. Now, six years later, Mr. Hollinghurst has come out with his second novel The Folding Star, which fulfills and surpasses the success and artistry of his previous book.

Jack Fritscher on Robert Mapplethorpe (1995)
Few artists have been mythologized as quickly and as completely as the late Robert Mapplethorpe. The incredible life of the controversial photographer is given new focus in the biography Mapplethorpe: Assault with a Deadly Camera by friend, confidant, and former lover Jack Fritscher

David Drake (1994)
David Drake is a multi-hyphenated boy wonder. At 30 the playwright-actor-activist has already won an Obie Award for best performance ion an Off Broadway play for his explosive creation 'The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me'. . .

Dorothy Allison (1994)
Dorothy Allison began her writing career with a collection of poetry called The Women Who Hate Me. Her next effort, the short story collection Trash won two Lambda Book Awards in 1989. In 1992 her first novel Bastard Out of Carolina was a finalist for the prestigious National Book Award. . .

Stanley Siegel (1994)
Understanding Ourselves:Talking With Gay Psychotherapist and Author Stanley Siegel...UNCHARTED LIVES is a fascinating study by gay psychotherapist Stanley Siegel and straight Newsday columnist Ed Lowe Jr. The text is a mass analysis of how gay men develop through the eight male life passages from ‘pre-emergence’ to ‘mentoring’. The book is the result of numerous interviews and research. This data is balanced with Siegel’s own dramatic mid-life coming out story. . .

Pomo Afro Homos (1993)
The Pomo Afro Homos (Post Modern African-American Homosexuals) is a performance group consisting of Brian Freeman, Djola Branner, and new member Marvin K. White. The group began in 1991 out of growing frustration at the lack of black gay voices and a deep need to express that richness of experience.

David Leavitt (1993)
In 1984 David Leavitt burst onto the literary scene with a stunning collection of gay short stories entitled Family Dancing. Two years later he published his first novel that later went on to become a successful BBC film, 'The Lost Language of Cranes'. These two critically acclaimed works were followed with two more, Equal Affections and A Place I’ve Never Been. . .

F. Valentine Hooven III (1993)
In August, St. Martin's Press published Tom of Finland: His Life and Times, a biography of the controversial artist by F. Valentine Hooven III. Recently I talked with Mr. Hooven about the book, the lasting popularity of Tom's work, and his ongoing work with the Tom of Finland Foundation.

Janis Ian (1993)
Janis Ian burst onto the music scene in 1965 when, at the age of fourteen, she wrote and recorded 'Society's Child', a controversial song about an interracial teen couple and the social pressure to end their relationship...Today Janis Ian still lives in Nashville with her partner of four years and two dogs. I recently talked with her about coming out, coming back, and a lifetime love affair with poetry of her music. . .

Jewelle Gomez (1993)
In 1991 Firebrand Books released Jewelle Gomez' first novel The Gilda Stories to superb reviews. The mythological fantasy adventure tale about an African-American lesbian vampire went on to win two Lambda Literary Awards. . .

Joan Nestle (1993)
Joan Nestle is a self-identified femme lesbian. Her ongoing interest in butch-femme identities pervades her work from her award winning first collection, A Restricted Country, to her new anthology The Persistent Desire: A Butch-Femme Reader. . .

Michael Lane and Jim Crotty (1993)
In 1985 lovers Michael Lane and Jim Crotty took off in an Econoline 100 for an extended journey and life on the road with their two cats, Nurse and Nurse’s Aide. To pay for necessities such as food and gas they began 'MONK', a newsletter of their madcap of Kerou-wacky experiences to send to friends. . .

Charles Karel Bouley (1993)
Charles Karel Bouley is doing a lot for gay visibility. He is America’s #1 gay radio talk-show host and along with his late partner Andrew Howard formed 'Karel and Andrew Live' which aired on KFI AM 640 in Los Angeles, making them the first openly gay male couple ever to host a talk show in a major radio market . . .

Robert Ford (1993)
In early August of 1993 Robert Ford, the publisher, editor, co-art director, and primary driving force behind ‘Thing’ announced that newly released issue #10 would be the final one. ‘Thing’ had come to an end, but it rode the crest of zine popularity with a quality and style that was nothing short of superb. It helped set the pace as well as the standards of the underground zine movement. . .

Samuel Steward (1993)
Some of his titles include Understanding the Male Hustler, $tud, Dear Sammy, Murder is Murder is Murder, Chapters from an Autobiography, Bad Boys and Tough Tattoos, Parisian Lives, etc. as well as his seven erotic novels under the pseudonym/alter ego Phil Andros which include My Brother The Hustler, The Greek Way, and San Francisco Hustler. . .

Dennis Cooper (1992)
Dennis Cooper is the author of such books asThe Tenderness of Wolves, Idols, Safe, and Closer. He is without a doubt the most controversial of his contemporaries primarily due to his notorious novel Frisk. . .

Scott McPherson (1992)
When Scott McPherson died from complications due to AIDS on November 7, 1992, the theater was robbed of an extremely talented young playwright. Scott's major work, the absurdist, poignant, and brilliant 'Marvin's Room' received numerous accolades including The Outer Critic's Circle Award, The Drama Desk Award, The John Gassner Playwriting Award, and The Dramatist.

Harry Hay (1992)
In 1950 Harry Hay established The Mattachine Society that historians tend to mark as the official starting point of the modern gay movement. The Mattachine Society laid the foundations for activism two decades before Stonewall and was crucial to all brands and manifestations of gay and lesbian activism that have arisen since then. . .

Dick Sargent (1992)
Dick Sargent is known to most people asThe Second Darren Stephens. The truth of the matter is he was actually cast before Dick York (along with Tammy Grimes as Samantha) but had to turn down the role due to a commitment to another series. Regardless, Dick Sargent's career was much more expansive than 'Bewitched'. . .

George Chauncey (1992)
George Chauncey is the Professor of American History at The University of Chicago and the author of the Lambda Award winning historical opus Gay New York.

Jack Nichols (1992)
Jack Nichols is one of the elder statesmen of the gay liberation movement. His tireless work on behalf of The Mattachine Society, his efforts to bring the issue of gay rights to a national public consciousness, his work to unify community members and incite gay pride. . .

Marc Acito (1992)
He Works Hard for The Money:Talking with HOW I PAID FOR COLLEGE author Marc Acito. . .

David Wojnarowicz (1991)
When I interviewed the amazing David Wojnarowicz in August 1991 it was a very clear case of hero worship. I was in awe of the raw brilliance of this man. It blazed and crackled in every sector of his work -- his photos, his film and collage work, his writing… It was how the man lived his life.

Quentin Crisp ('86,'88,'90)
Quentin Crisp was born on Christmas Day in 1908 and lived without compromise right from the very start. In 1930s England he was "not merely a self-confessed homosexual, but a self evident one" with lilac hair, eye shadow, capes, scarves, and blouses. Unable to find a place in proper society Quentin carved his own place - as a male prostitute, a nude model, a window dresser, and an assortment of fringe careers. He first came to public attention in the 1960s with a radio interview and afterward was approached to write his autobiography. With the publication of The Naked Civil Servant and the subsequent film of the same title starring John Hurt, Mr. Crisp's star rose to even greater prominence and an extremely unique celebrity was born. . .