Nicki Green

Sex Objects
Glazed porcelain with wood hooks
Dimensions variable
2009
Work in Exhibition:

Sex Objects
Glazed porcelain with wood hooks
Dimensions variable
2009
(Close-up and gallery view)

Artist's Statement

Fiber arts, a collection of processes pertinent to my previous body of work, allowed me to deeply envelop myself in this history of women’s work, ironically enough, concurrently to a  developing (crafting) my own (trans) woman identity. The rhythmic undulating of the sewing machine coupled with forceful massaging of wool fibers expressed a deep seeded rejection of the position I was feeling forced into, transversing a polar gendered existence and feeling othered within each space along the way.

As my thoughts of my own femininity and inherently, and therefore oppositionally sexist femme identity resonated less and differently, my accepting and glorifying of a gender queer or more effeminate (versus feminine) sense of self rose and mutated, as did the nature of my material process, the fluid shift to ceramics.

Ceramics is, by nature, instinctually feminine by association (craft-based in production and domestically functional and feminine in use), but it's technical history is male dominated, craftsmen and skilled artisans working in shops and studios as opposed to textile felting, thread spinning and garment sewing as basic functioning within the home. Ceramics, therefore, is much more of a queered practice as it's renders itself a male-dominated craft, an oxymoron as craft in and of itself is deemed feminine and oppressively reserved for women, yet ceramics being held in a male-dominated trade deems it if not more masculine, than a total destruction of oppositionally sexist notions of production, craft, and gendered expression. This move to ceramics has been that of a queered move, taking with me further developed ideas of being a queer individual using a queered art practice to subvert notions of oppressive normative ideas of self.

Sex Objects operates as a description of the functional aspects of the pieces themselves, highlighting their resemblances to both sex toys and (historical) delft china, both functional entities holding rich gendered histories. Oppositionally, Sex Objects refers to the act of objectification itself, the vulnerability one is exposed to through not only the act of sex, but to the overbearing culture that these pieces work to deconstruct and annihilate in the first place.

Through the technical use of traditional ceramic processes, I am working to renaturalize the genitals in question, and use this renaturalization process to empower and glorify the ambiguous and indescribable through traditional recognizable tropes, both physically and materialistically. By doing so, I'm hoping to deconstruct our human ability to label and recall, amplifying the beauty in a queered existence we seem to only have begun to explore.

- Nicki Green